Uncovered Gems #4: François Mauriac

The list of Nobel laureates for Literature contains more French men than it does of any other demographic. That should not put you off reading Mauriac. But you may have trouble locating his work. His most famous novel, Thérèse Desqueyroux, is possibly the only one you’ll find in a bookshop today, due to the recentContinue reading “Uncovered Gems #4: François Mauriac”

“A catholic taste,” she said

and I nodded, not knowing at all what she meant, for I was not, nor have ever been, Catholic. How then, I wondered, was my reading taste catholic? The word, at the time, meant Mary and popes, not expansive, far-reaching, inclusive. Now I give my old teacher’s words new meaning: yes, catholic in reading, inContinue reading ““A catholic taste,” she said”

Five Nobel Laureates that should be better known

The week just passed has seen quite a bit of controversy (some of which I’ve participated in) over Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize for Literature win. My personal favourite was the Tweeter who seemed confused over which Nobel Dylan won and felt prompted to say that, as good as it was that Dylan had won aContinue reading “Five Nobel Laureates that should be better known”

Grace, charm, a clenched jaw

If what Christians believe is true, then Gide knows now what all of us will know before long. What is it that he knows? What is it that he sees? (Francois Mauriac, “The Death of Andre Gide”) Was it better by far to be wily, in the end? Maintaining to the last where Montaigne hadContinue reading “Grace, charm, a clenched jaw”