In Translation: Restless Heart/Urolige Hjerte

Herre, du har skabt os til dig, og vort hjerte er uroligt, indtil det finder hvile hos dig. Lord, you have made us for yourself and our hearts are restless until they rest in you. (St Augustine, Confessions) When I first started learning Danish last year and was looking for anything to help me, IContinue reading “In Translation: Restless Heart/Urolige Hjerte”

Uncovered Gems #5: The Danish Psalmist

In the Danish Golden Age of literature and philosophy, there were three significant names that still stand out today: Hans Christian Andersen, Søren Kierkegaard and N.F.S. Grundtvig. The non-Danish world has very much heard of the first two but the third is as unknown as it is unpronounceable. And perhaps understandably so. He is ofContinue reading “Uncovered Gems #5: The Danish Psalmist”

“And can it be that I should gain…”: Streaming Page CXVI’s “Lent to Maundy Thursday”

What is the first note of Lent? Ash Wednesday – this year on March 5th, next Wednesday in fact, will in most churches sound a low and melancholy tone, pregnant with penitence and reflection. But contemporary hymnsters, Page CXVI, begin their “Lent to Maundy Thursday” with jubilation: Charles Wesley’s classic “And can it be thatContinue reading ““And can it be that I should gain…”: Streaming Page CXVI’s “Lent to Maundy Thursday””

“For mercies countless as the sands…”

John Newton, the famous hymn writer and pastor, certainly knew how to reflect on his life. Never forgetting his former life as a slave trader, womaniser and general no-good, he always approached life with a grateful heart, forever marvelling at the “amazing grace” he had known in his later life. One birthday, towards the endContinue reading ““For mercies countless as the sands…””

On reading a biography of John Newton

I’d have lived on Clapham Green And played upon its soil; I’d have joined their century And burnt up slavery’s spoils.   I’d have lived in Olney too And written hymns with men Whose poor hearts burnt with Gospel flame And kindled it with pen.   But God has made me live today: The worldContinue reading “On reading a biography of John Newton”

Doxology (For Thomas Ken)

Today we remember Thomas Ken, the seventeenth-century British bishop and hymn-writer most famous for writing the hymn commonly known as “The Doxology”, a hymn much-loved to many people and which has had a recent revival in a lot of churches. I’ve based today’s poem around some of the lines of that hymn, in memory ofContinue reading “Doxology (For Thomas Ken)”